DCC Outcomes

Department of Heritage and Arts

Department Leadership:

Julie Fisher, Exeuctive Director
Mike Hansen, Deputy Director

Mission Statement:

To improve the quality of life for the people of Utah, DH&A creates, preserves and promotes Heritage and Arts.

Performance Reports

(Click report below; view to right)
  • Overview
  • Digitization and Automation
  • Ten-year Plan to End Chronic Homelessness
  • Stronger Communities Thorugh History
  • Arts and Cultural Outreach
  • State Library Services
  • Expand all reports on one

More Department Performance:

Emerging Issues and Strategies for DH&A
External Link Learn more at the Department of Heritage and Arts website

Overview

The Department of Heritage and Arts (DH&A) has been referred to as the ‘heart and soul' of Utah. While they appreciate the individuality and culture of Utah's communities, they also celebrate as one community this state's great and diverse heritage, both past and present. The Department’s vision is that “Utahns have a high quality of life;  they live and participate in thriving communities that are strengthened by the services and support provided by DH&A.”
From ending chronic homelessness, funding rural development, and preserving the historic past, to honoring cultural diversity, fostering and cultivating the arts, and providing educational resources, the programs and services provided by the divisions of DH&A are unique; but have common values and goals. Collectively, State History, the State Library, Arts and Museums, Indian Affairs, and Ethnic Affairs, united by our Department’s mission and vision, focus on initiatives that provide meaningful resources for our constituents.

 

Digitization - Our Commitment to Providing Access to Resources

Why this is important:

DH&A’s digitization initiative is a department-wide effort to automate and enhance access to cultural, financial, and technical resources. With online access, Utahns will eventually be able to see state-owned art, find historical photographs, access government documents and complete applications for state grants online.  Over time, this reduces the Department’s cost to operate while increasing its capacity.

What we're doing about it:

DH&A’s digitization strategy involves efforts in three areas:

  • Automating business processes.  To date there are a total of 27 functions that have been developed.  The fact that some of these were done by in-house staff is evidence of increased capacity.
  • Put collections online.  To date, DH&A has digitized over a million cultural assets and pieces of the state’s collections.  (View an example here - http://www.mwdl.org/ )
  • Data optimization.  DH&A is essentially finding where it’s meaningful data is, linking it together, and then using it to make better decisions.  This is an ongoing process.

 

 

Ten-year Plan to End Chronic Homelessness

Data Source: DH&A

Why this is important:

Homelessness has been growing across the country, but in Utah it is actually being reduced. The chronically homeless make up a small part of the homeless population, and yet use a very large part of the resources for the homeless

What we're doing about it:

Utah is considered a national leader in progress toward ending chronic homelessness, and we have a 10-year plan to end chronic homelessness by the year 2014. Housing and Community Development assistschronically homeless persons gain permanent housing and to make other strides in self-sufficiency. Close collaborations have been formed to implement the State Ten-Year Plan to End Chronic Homelessness and regional plans developed with local leaders across the state.

Utah currently has in use or development nearly 600 units of supportive housing, where chronically homeless people are not only housed, but receive the supportive services they need to make real changes in their lives. At the current rate of progress, and with the help of many Utahns including those taxpayers checking a box for support of the Pamela Atkinson Homeless Trust Fund, Utah stands every chance of being one of the few states which really will affect chronic homelessness.

Stronger Communities Through History


Data Source: DH&A

Why this is important:

Engagement with history and historical resources strengthens the economy of communities and the state as a whole. Heritage tourists bring in dollars, historic preservation creates local jobs and revitalizes communities, and efficient assistance with cultural resources and ancient human remains facilitates development projects. Library and online resources facilitate learning, research, and effective utilization of heritage resources. As a result, a stronger connection with the past provides a foundation of stability in a rapidly changing world.

What we're doing about it:

  • State History helps communities make the most of their heritage resources with grants, technical assistance, support, and historical documents.
  • State History preserves and provides public access to documents, articles, and photos that tell the story of Utah’s past. Hundreds of thousands of photographs and all of our publications—some 50,000 pages—are online.
  • The preservation tax credit keeps federal dollars in Utah and encourages preservation. Historic preservation creates more household income and jobs per dollar spent than highway projects do.
  • Cutting-edge assistance to developers, government agencies, and individuals helps streamline the money and time they must spend in meeting federal and state cultural resources mandates.

 

Arts and Cultural Outreach


Data Source: DH&A

Why this is important:

The goal of the grants made by the Division of Arts and Museums is to make the arts available to everyone in the state.  The Division meets its goals by maintaining strategic partners and maximizing the efficient use of its resources.  Through the grants process, Utahns are able to preserve and promote their artistic heritage and cultural traditions while encouraging new artistic exploration and creation.

What we're doing about it:

The Division of Arts and Museums provides matching grants to non-profit arts organizations and museums.  They administer programs that support arts in public education, conserve the state’s fine art collection, provide traveling exhibits, oversee public art development, and promote artists through statewide competitions and exhibitions. They also provide arts and cultural outreach for over six million visitors to museums and for 1.35 million school children, including 130,000 underserved children. 

 

State Library Services


Data Source: DH&A

Why this is important:

Utah’s libraries encourage and provide the best possible library services to the citizens of Utah so they may have access to the information resources and tools they need to fully participate in the 21st Century culture and economy.

What we're doing about it:

The Utah State Library provides consulting and certification services to local libraries.  Additionally, they circulate the world's largest braille and books-on-tape collection to blind or disabled patrons, facilitate interlibrary loans, operate bookmobiles in rural counties, and provide online access to a multitude of resources via Public Pioneer.