Utah Department of Transportation

Department Leadership:

John Njord, Executive Director
Carlos Braceras, Deputy Director

Mission Statement:

Quality Transportation Today, Better Transportation Tomorrow.

Performance Reports

(Click report below; view to right)
  • Overview
  • Pavement Preservation
  • Bridges
  • Snow and Ice Control
  • Incident Management
  • Reduce Fatalities
  • Improve Travel Time
  • Expand all reports on one (1)

More Department Performance:

Emerging Issues and Strategies for UDOT
UDOT 2010 Strategic Direction (3mb)
External Link Learn more at their web site

Overview

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Data Source: UDOT

Over the last 20 years, Utah has generally experienced economic prosperity and growth. At the same time, however, that prosperity and growth has created challenges for the transportation system.

Between 1990 and 2009 the state experienced a 62 percent increase in population. The amount of travel or number of vehicles miles traveled (VMT), has increased 76 percent. However, during that same time frame, the state only added an additional six percent of capacity to the highway system.

Projections show the trend will continue. By 2015, travel will have increased by a remarkable 90 to 100 percent, population by approximately 85 to 90 percent and new capacity by a mere seven percent.

This trend is not unique to Utah. VMT is drastically outpacing population growth all across the country. However, Utah is growing much faster than most other states. In fact, by the year 2050 more than five million people will call Utah home, making it one of the fastest growing states in the country.

The Department of Transportation faces the significant challenge of meeting the transportation needs of a growing state with limited resources. UDOT is addressing this challenge through its strategic goals, known as the “Final Four.”

  1. Take Care of What We Have
  2. Make the System Work Better
  3. Improve Safety
  4. Increase Capacity

Pavement Preservation

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Data Source: UDOT

Why this is important:

Much like changing the oil in your vehicle, proactive preservation pavement treatments and routine maintenance will extend the service life of the roadway pavement. Well maintained pavements have fewer potholes and are safer to drive on.

What we're doing about it:

Through UDOT’s efforts, the ride quality is in a good or fair condition on 99 percent of the interstates, 96 percent on Level 1 roadways (high volume roads) and 84 percent on Level 2 roadways (low volume roads).

Bridges

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Data Source: UDOT

Why this is important:

The state has dedicated significant resources both to construct and maintain the bridge system to its current overall condition. Similar to any asset, well timed maintenance is the most effect/efficient method of extending the life of that asset. Continued maintenance funding will be required to maintain an excellent overall condition of the bridge system.

What we're doing about it:

All structures in the state are inspected on a two-year cycle. Each structure is rated on a zero to one-hundred scale (know nationally as the Sufficiency Rating). During the last year 77 percent of the state’s bridges had a sufficiency rating of good, 22 percent received a fair rating and less than 1 percent (.8%) were rated poor.

Snow and Ice Control

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Data Source: UDOT

Why this is important:

The Department faces a significant challenge in keeping Utah's roads free of ice and snow during the winter months. Snow and ice removal is a critical task in order to ensure the safety of motorists and the health of the roadway.

What we're doing about it:

UDOT's Maintenance Management System assigns a letter grade to the Department's snow removal efforts. The Department's target grade is "A-". A grade of "A" represents clear, dry conditions; a grade of "B" represents snow or ice building up occasionally and a grade of "C" represents snow or ice building up regularly. For FY10, UDOT achieved a grade of "B” for snow and ice control.

Incident Management

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Data Source: UDOT

Why this is important:

Incidents that impede the free flow of traffic (crashes, stalled vehicles, debris in the roadway) need to be removed from the travel lanes as quickly as possible. For every minute saved clearing an incident, five minutes of traffic back-up is prevented and secondary crashes are minimized.

What we're doing about it:

UDOT's Incident Management Teams support the Utah Highway Patrol in clearing incidents. They are committed to clearing non-injury incidents in 30 minutes or less, serious injuries in 60 minutes or less, and fatalities in less than 120 minutes.

Reduce Fatalities

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Data Source: UDOT

Why this is important:

Safety improvements made to the state highway system can help reduce the number of traffic related deaths.

What we're doing about it:

The Department is committed to an ultimate goal of eliminating traffic related deaths by reducing the amount of fatalities on Utah highways by two percent each year. The target reduction is calculated from a baseline of 373 fatalities in the year 2000. In 2009, 244 people lost their lives on Utah roads; a reduction of 32 people from the previous year.

Inprove Travel Time

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Data Source: UDOT

Why this is important:

Motorists measure mobility in one simple way: How long does it take me to get where I need to go? The Department is committed to ensuring that travel times and congestion are minimized, even as population and travel continue to grow.

What we're doing about it:

The Department began measuring travel times on key corridors along the Wasatch Front (I-15 and I-80) in 2004. There are four key commuting corridors to and from Salt Lake City. Measurements for FY10 were:

  • Ogden (AM) - 62mph (excellent and stable); (PM) - 48mph (fair and decreasing)
  • Provo (AM) - 53mph (excellent and increasing); (PM) - 54mph (fair and decreasing)
  • Tooele (AM) - 71mph (excellent and increasing); (PM) - 69mph (excellent and stable)
  • Park City (AM) - 60mph (excellent and stable); (PM) - 64mph (excellent and increasing)

Key travel time points to note from this data over the last several years:

  • Ogden (AM/PM) - improved significantly since the opening of Legacy Parkway reducing I-15 traffic congestion.
  • Provo (AM/PM) - improved capacity since the completion of several projects on I-15.
  • Park City (PM) - improved due to reconstruction of I-80 between I-15 and 2300 East increasing capacity.